Spud

On Thu, Aug 11, 2011 at 1:02 PM <cekinnersley@comcast.net> wrote:

Hi Jake,

Nice to hear from someone in the old neighborhood. I think I remember Mr. Kale. The first Time I met him he was sweeping outside across from the church, I was about 10. He told me he had the hardest stomach in the world. He said, “Go ahead, hit me as hard as you can in the stomach” I really didn’t want to hit an old guy in the stomach or any where else. But he kept after me, “go ahead hit me with all you got, go ahead hit me.”  So I gave him a little tap, he said “no, go ahead hit me really hard”. I gave it all I had, he didn’t feel it. After that I always wondered about him and just what that was all about? We used to go in the field and grab the candles the church always threw out there. We played in that abandoned garage near by there also. I remember laying low upstairs there when the cops came in to search for local kids hanging out in there.

I think I might have been up in that attic in your house at one time, I vaguely remember going to watch a snake eat a rat. I think I remember Jimmy Doughty; he lived right on the corner of Cedargrove. If it’s the same Larry Levine whose father was a baker, I knew him well; he lived a few houses down from me on my street. The marshal twins Timmy and Tommy lived on the other side of the street from me, as did Frank McGinnis.

Talk about the flashlight in the old hospital. One night I led a gang of us down the steps to the morgue to search for the scary guy with glowing eyes that was alleged to lurk down there. I led the way with a flashlight with the gang of guys behind me and as we got to the bottom of the stairs a guy with a black beard dressed in denim jeans and jacket suddenly walked out of the shadows and into the light, I turned around and everyone was gone and there I was with just this guy. He turned out to be an abstract expressionist-artist by the name of Jay Milder and he took me up to the third floor where he had an entire wing sealed off hidden there that he had set up for his painting studio. He had stretched canvases floor to ceiling some as big as thirty foot long. It was a sight to see. He told me not to let the others know about the studio and to keep an eye on it for him and guard it from the local kids, I was about 11 and he was 25. It turned out that he and his wife Sheila had rented the store front at the corner of Cedargrove and Boehm Street (my street). We became good friends. A year later I helped him move to a studio he rented in Greenwich Village in Manhattan. He went on to become one of the most prolific expressionist painters of our time. He taught at the New York School of Art and has galleries all over the world. Sheila was an artist also, she did silk screens and became a teacher in Manhattan. She still lives there. He operates out of a huge warehouse in Easton Pennsylvania now.

 Click on the below link and Click on the short video  

http://raysjumpin.blogspot.com/2010/04/jump-again-forum-for-new-world-culture.html

http://www.brooklynrail.org/2006/06/artseen/jay-milder

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jay_Milder

Meeting Jay Milder in the old abandoned hospital morgue in New Dorp Beach left me with a real inspiration for the rest of my life. At 12 years old when I helped Jay move to his new art Gallery in Manhattan We had lunch at the Horn and Hardart Automat, something I will never forget. In 2009 I left this post on this Internet site http://theautomat.net/discus/messages/1/2.html#POST1145 – under Memories of the Automat.

Posted on Thursday, February 19, 2009 – 10:58 pm:    

When I was twelve years old in 1959 I helped a good friend, Jay Milder a renowned abstract expressionist artist, then in his mid twenties move into his new studio loft in Manhattan. We had lunch at the Horn & Hardart Automat with another artist friend of Jay’s; an older, kind, but disheveled looking man wearing a fishing hat who introduced himself to me as Norman. Norman and I chatted through lunch. When we finished and were walking out the door, Jay turned to me and said do you know who that was that you were just talking to? I said no, he told me he was Norman. And Jay replied, yes he is Norman; Norman Rockwell.


I went to PS41 and New Dorp High School. I was there during the riots during the teachers strike when desks were hurled through the second story windows onto the crowded sidewalks below. But I have to admit I played Hooky for more of the time than I actually attended. Most of that time you could find me at Pinky & Jacks sucking down Chocolate egg crèmes and munching on buttered english muffins and french fries there on New Dorp Lane. Sometimes I would use my bus pass and spend all day riding the ferry boat back and forth listening to the wash board bands and other entertainers on the boat; or just walk all over downtown Manhattan all day instead of attending class. My uncle Earl Kinnersley (deceased) was The Captain of the Fire Boat – The Smoke with the NYFD out of the Battery in Manhattan.

Below is a photo from the NEW YORK TIMES on March 06, 1962. The top floor of the second house from the right is where I lived. I’m on the front porch with Drew Gardella (I believe he is deceased), but neither of us are very visible. One of the many times our street was flooded. That’s the beach at the end of the street. From the kitchen in the back of the house I could view the back of the stores (Vinnie’s) and the intersection of Herman Street and Cedargrove. We watched many of the gang fights from there.

Three photos of me spanning a 20 year period between 1956 – 1976

Spud New Dorp Beach SI NYC

CE KINNERSLEY U.S. ARMY MEDICAL CORP KOREA 1966

CE KINNERSLEY EDISON POLICE DEPARTMENT 1976

Because the city was going to take the property, my parents bought the only house they ever owned in Edison New Jersey. We moved into it in August of 1963. I finished High school there at Edison High in 1965 and was drafted  into the Army and found myself in Korea in 1966.

I was devastated when I revisited my old neighborhood only to find it gone and covered in an over grown jungle of weeds. But I will never forget the life I so thoroughly enjoyed there, and those times, and my friends. I agree with Josh; it is a crime and a sin what New York City has done to that area. But they have always had a different political agenda that is fueled by money and greed

I hope America wakes up to the secret agenda being applied to our country right now, although it may already be too late. The media is censored, the lies are being told, and you are about to become The North American Union, the final quarter of the New World Order. America needs to wake up to the truth about 911.

Chuck


From: “New Dorp Beach History” <newdorpbeachhistory@gmail.com>
To: “JOSH” <josh.jakob@gmail.com>, “Bob Jakob” <ndbmedic@gmail.com>, cekinnersley@comcast.net
Sent: Monday, August 8, 2011 10:11:01 AM
Subject: Re: FELLOW RESIDENT OF NEW DORP BEACH

Hi, Chuck,

I’m Josh’s dad and I could have written most of the words in your email. I’m Jake and we lived next to Deacon Ross on Seafoam (before he became a deacon); back then, he ran the altar boys and did church maintenance, although Mr. Kale, who lived across the street on Cedargrove Avenue, was the sexton.

Like Josh and his brother, I graduated from Our Lady Queen of Peace. I’m a retired FDNY paramedic.

My “gang” hung out at the beach end of Waterside outside the Ocean Edge Colony’s clubhouse or in my house in “Jake’s Coffin” which was the unfinished attic decorated with street signs and Christmas lights. At one point, I had a 4′ fox snake who would entertain the guys by eating store-bought rats.

I hung with Kooch – his sister still lives in the place on Dustan with her husband, Ray Eger, retired FDNY lieutenant, who’s something of a real estate mogul, buying, selling, & renting houses in the neighborhood. I also ran at various times with Jimmy Doughty, Nick Riccio, & Larry Levine. There was also Johnny Potusek (sp?) who lived near the store-front clubhouse near Vinnie’s.

My sister (step-sister), Georgia Remsbecker, lived on Herman Street until forced out by the City. She and her father, Bill, moved to Roma Avenue. Bill married my mother. Georgia married Dennis Fagan, deceased, from Cedargrove Avenue near Garibaldi. Dennis was the brother of ’60’s NDHS football star Jimmy Fagan.

I remember the actual building, a abandoned hotel across from the Britton Cottage at Cedargrove & the Lane which became a lot with a big tree and a rope swing. A scary night could be spent exploring the old hospital behind Our Lady of Lourdes with flashlights.

Josh is investigating our history and the days before we got here. We miss our idea of New Dorp Beach and, although he knows the woods and fields of the area following the City’s condemnation, he sees the government taking away another part of our history with the recent destruction of Cedargrove Beach Club and the construction of the “park” along Cedargrove Avenue from the Lane to Ebbitts Street. Whatever history existed between Cedargrove and the beach is now gone.

Josh is trying to document the loss.

-Bob Jakob

On Aug 8, 2011 12:13 AM, “New Dorp Beach History” <newdorpbeachhistory@gmail.com> wrote:
> ———- Forwarded message ———-
> From: <cekinnersley@comcast.net>
> Date: Aug 7, 2011 11:23 PM
> Subject: Re: FELLOW RESIDENT OF NEW DORP BEACH
> To: “New Dorp Beach History” <newdorpbeachhistory@gmail.com>
>
> Thank you for answering my email Joshua,
>
>
>
> I was more than likely your fathers paper boy between 1958 and 1962. I
> delivered the Staten Island Advance
>
> daily and The Star ledger on Sundays for quite a few years, That was my
> route; all those streets off of Cedar Grove and on up to Cuba Avenue.
>
>
>
> I had a good friend named Koochie that lived on Dustin Street and another
> named Louis Senno that lived right there on Seafoam near your dads house
> until his family moved to 18 Garibaldi Ave. I frequented Eddies store for
> candy in those days and Vinnie Fisher’s deli on the other side of the street
> for sub sandwiches and cigarettes. And I used to buy homemade sausage from a
> little Italian shop on Cedar Grove Ave somewheres there around Seafoam.
>
>
>
> I lived about four houses from the Beach on Boehm Street (not there any
> more) on the whole top floor of a three story home owned by a family named
> Gardella. There were 28 windows in our apartment and you could see the light
> house and watch all the ships coming in and out of NYC harbor from there. My
> mother had nine children and at that time there were six of us plus my
> parents and a dog living in that apartment.
>
>
>
> I really loved playing on the beach and in the old abandoned hospital
> further down the beach back in behind the Roman Catholic Church. During a
> hurricane we had one time, I got paid $10.00 to ferry old people out of the
> nursing home that was located in front of the old abandoned hospital in a
> row boat to dry land on the other side of Cedar Grove Ave. I was 11 or 12
> years old and made many trips all day for that 10 bucks.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> THE OLD ABANDONED HOSPITAL
>
>
>
>
>
> We used to build Bonn fires every night on the beach. I had my own gang
> called Kinnersley’s raiders. It was the Seaside bungalows that used to show
> the movies near the beach and all my friends and I would bring our own
> folding chairs and crash the show every weekend. And mind you this was all
> between the time I was nine and 15 years old.
>
>
>
> One thing that left a lasting impression on my life was on December 16th
> 1960 when two jets crashed in mid air over New York City, one went down
> in Brooklyn and one went down on us in that neighborhood. It had just snowed
> and there was a good foot of snow on the ground we heard the crash, and
> suddenly bodies, body parts and debris rained down out of the sky on all
> those streets in that neighborhood. I remember walking along the street and
> you would see red blotches in the snow and you would find burnt twisted
> pieces of metal with blood, skin and hair on them. There were headless,
> legless, armless torsos dangling in the trees and the smell was horrendous.
> Me and my friends help gather up the body parts and put them in pick up
> trucks that would then take them over to miller field where they laid them
> out and tried to sort them for identification purposes. And it seemed the
> pilot remained alive long enough to land what was left of the main
> fuselage on a narrow helicopter lane which saved our neighborhood from
> further disaster. There were no survivors from the jet that came down into
> our neighborhood and I believe only one survivor from the other jet that
> came down in Brooklyn. I remember even years later you could find twisted
> metal from those planes in the sand on the beach.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Well that’s enough for now, I got to go walk my Shih Tzu – Saltydog. You
> should pass this on to your dad, I’m sure he can relate to much of this.
> Feel free to call me anytime, my phone number is (561) 880-1418. I’m a
> retired police detective living in Palm Beach County Florida now.
>
>
>
> Sincerely Chuck
>
> A FELLOW RESIDENT OF NEW DORP BEACH STATEN ISLAND NYC
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ——————————
>
> *From: *”New Dorp Beach History” <newdorpbeachhistory@gmail.com>
> *To: *cekinnersley@comcast.net
> *Sent: *Sunday, August 7, 2011 8:03:31 PM
> *Subject: *Re: FELLOW RESIDENT OF NEW DORP BEACH
>
> Hello Spud!
>
> Thank you for contacting me. I am only 30 years old, but my father has
> lived in our same house at 30 seafoam since the 50s. He is the one who
> inspired me to discover the past of new dorp beach, and how parks has
> destroyed it since the 60s. I would love to find out more about living on
> boehm.
>
> Let me know how to best contact you, or, just continue to email me, I answer
> it the best.
>
> Joshua Jakob
> On Aug 7, 2011 6:45 PM, <cekinnersley@comcast.net> wrote:
>>
>>
>> Hi JAKOB, I am a 64 year old young lad who like you grew up in that same
> New Dorp Beach Neighborhood. I lived at 29 Boehm Street. I often played in
> the old abandoned hospital on the beach with my friends. I have very fond
> memories of my favorite neighborhood and found this article on you while
> searching my computer for photos and history of a part of my life I will
> always cherish. Would love to chat with you about this, We may even know
> each other. I used to bring my fold up chair and crash the movies they
> showed there at Seafoam. I can be reached at this email address. I really
> hope I will hear from you. My name is Charles Earl Kinnersley but then in
> that neighborhood I was known by my nickname Spud or Spudy. Thank you.
>>
>>
>>
>> Sincerely C.E. Kinnersley

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